Imo's Pics

From early, Byzantine-influenced works to abstract art with 'rhythm', discover Picture Research Manager Imogen Pasley-Tyler's top images and clips in the archive 

1. What is your role at Bridgeman?

My role within the Cataloguing Department is to source new material for clients; some are for specific images from museums and collections we represent, directly, others are more elusive and thematic requests and require a degree of ‘detective work’. 

 

2. What do you love most about the job? 

I love that every image transports you to a different corner of the planet, or a different era in history, or both; from Scythian jewellery to photos of Bonny and Clyde, so much you might never come across, ordinarily, in life. The constant research also fuels inquisitiveness and I feel I’ve probably discovered more about the world, and occasionally beyond, at Bridgeman, than I did at school and university together.

 

3. What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?

I generally deal with collections, more than with clients, but it seems there is still a tendency to associate us specifically with fine art; painting and sculpture, whereas the archive, now, incorporates so much more, in terms of history and culture. 

 

Imogen Pasley-Tyler
Imogen Pasley-Tyler

 

Imo's favourite images and clips in the archive are...

 

The Annunciation, detail of the Virgin, 1442 (fresco) (see 72388), Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro) (c.1387-1455) / Museo di San Marco dell'Angelico, Florence, Italy / Bridgeman Images
The Annunciation, detail of the Virgin, 1442 (fresco) (see 72388), Fra Angelico (Guido di Pietro) (c.1387-1455) / Museo di San Marco dell'Angelico, Florence, Italy / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

1. Fra Angelico's 'The Annunciation'

These paintings, at San Marco in Florence, were, I think, my initial encounters with the world of art history and have stuck with me, ever since. I, personally, feel that the more realistic and sophisticated works of the High Renaissance don’t possess half of the magic and impact of these early, Byzantine-influenced works; the beauty and simplicity; the pinks, gold & almond eyes are exquisite. 

 

 

 

2. Rembrandt's drawings

I’ve always loved drawings; I find they’re so much more revealing of the artist’s thought processes and intentions, than a finished work of art. Rembrandt is an obvious candidate and as with all great genius, there’s something timeless and modern about his work; his capacity to create something so very expressive with every single mark on the paper (the angel here is essentially a sequence of scribbles) so that even the negative space becomes animated. 

 

 Zacharias and the Angel, c.1635 (pen & ink on paper), Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) / Fogg Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, USA / Bridgeman Images
Zacharias and the Angel, c.1635 (pen & ink on paper), Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) / Fogg Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, USA / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Bajan riñendo, or They go down quarrelling, Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images
Bajan riñendo, or They go down quarrelling, Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Francisco Goya

There are few artists able to express so explicitly the angst of existential despair with such beauty, as Goya does. His skill in combining this horror and beauty in a single brushstroke is so compelling and terrifying. 

 

 

 

 

4. James Whistler's 'Nocturne in Black and Gold'

It’s this idea of ‘Synaesthesia’. To me, looking at this painting is like ‘watching’ a piece of music played out on a canvas; you can almost hear the ‘noise’ in this picture.

 

Nocturne in Black and Gold, the Falling Rocket, 1875 (oil on panel), James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) / Detroit Institute of Arts, USA / Gift of Dexter M. Ferry Jr. / Bridgeman Images
Nocturne in Black and Gold, the Falling Rocket, 1875 (oil on panel), James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834-1903) / Detroit Institute of Arts, USA / Gift of Dexter M. Ferry Jr. / Bridgeman Images

 

 

Nude Before a Mirror, Mornington Crescent (oil on canvas), Walter Richard Sickert (1860-1942) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images
Nude Before a Mirror, Mornington Crescent (oil on canvas), Walter Richard Sickert (1860-1942) / Private Collection / Photo © Christie's Images / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Walter Sickert

In a similar way to Goya, Sickert manages, by drawing on very dark subject-matter, to produce something beautiful, yet honest. There's no idealism and I love the way he uses vivid, often luminous, highlights to accentuate the emotional and psychological aspect of these otherwise shadowy and sinister colour palettes.

 

 

 

 

 

6. Gerhard Richter's 'Gray (Portrait of Albert Einstein)'

Essentially, I just love the texture of this; the manipulation and freedom of the heavy impasto style is somehow very satisfying and liberating. I also like the idea that it somehow represents the simultaneous chaos and clarity of the mind of a genius.

 

Gray (Portrait of Albert Einstein), 1972 (oil on masonite), Gerhard Richter (b.1932) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images
Gray (Portrait of Albert Einstein), 1972 (oil on masonite), Gerhard Richter (b.1932) / Private Collection / Bridgeman Images

 

 

 On the tennis court at 3 Fitzjohn’s Avenue / Bridgeman Footage
On the tennis court at 3 Fitzjohn’s Avenue / Bridgeman Footage

 

 

 

 

7. Playing Tennis

This is, essentially, what I believe sport should be; some stylish outfits, gentle activity and a lot of time spent on a bench…


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