Annabel's Pics

From Ballet Russes to 'Bad Santa', Bridgeman's Marketing Manager reveals some of her favourite images and clips in the archive. 

What is your role at Bridgeman?
 
As Marketing Manager, my job is to communicate the breadth and depth of the visual delights in the archive, and engage with the creative community to encourage them to visit our website again and again.
 
I manage the communications for the flagship London office including research, strategy, planning and implementation. On a regular basis I liaise with the sales team to see what new collections and artists might interest our different client sectors and this feeds into our content marketing strategy. Additionally, my team and I will research industry news, examine data and see what important cultural anniversaries and events are coming up. We are also active on social media and I have to try not to get too distracted by Twitter and Pinterest!   
 
It has been a busy year for Bridgeman with a new website, rebrand and many other initiatives. The marketing team has also expanded to accommodate a more global focus and we are continually bouncing around ideas. Recently, I have been working with Creative Review in promoting the Bridgeman Studio Award to attract new contemporary talent to the archive. We also have the Bridgeman Blog launching in May and I am actively looking for engaging writers to share art history knowledge as well as other art world topics. 

 

Marketing Manager Annabel O'Connor Fenton
Marketing Manager Annabel O'Connor Fenton

 

What do you love most about the job?
 
The location of Notting Hill is brilliant: there is nothing I like better on a sunny Friday than cycling down to Portobello Market during my lunch hour to have a rummage and discover something unique and fabulous. It is not a totally dissimilar process to stumbling upon a gem in the archive  – luckily, with my job, I can share those finds with the world.
 

What misconceptions do clients most commonly have about the archive?
 
While Bridgeman is best known as one of the world’s largest archives for fine art reproduction, not so many people are aware that it is an encyclopaedic resource with documentary photography, newsreel footage, maps, manuscripts and historical curiosities. With the upcoming blog, I hope more people will become involved in sharing every part of our collection.    


Annabel’s favourite images in the archive are…

 

Father Christmas, 1959, Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) / Musee d'Art et d'Histoire, Saint-Denis, France
Father Christmas, 1959, Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) / Musee d'Art et d'Histoire, Saint-Denis, France

 

 

 

 

1. Bad Santa

Picasso had a great sense of humour and childlike sense of fun. This is evident in the characterful faces on his ceramics and this naughty Santa Claus.

 

 

2. Egyptian yoga

Over the last few years I have become a yoga devotee and while this image depicts an Egyptian acrobat, the backbend reminds me of a life-affirming yoga pose. The Ancient Egyptians were wonderful artists as can be seen by their startlingly realistic mummy portraits.

 

Fragment of a wall painting depicting an acrobatic dancer entertaining at court, New Kingdom, from Deir-El Medina (fresco), Egyptian 19th Dynasty (c.1297-1185 BC) / Egyptian Museum, Turin, Italy
Fragment of a wall painting depicting an acrobatic dancer entertaining at court, New Kingdom, from Deir-El Medina (fresco), Egyptian 19th Dynasty (c.1297-1185 BC) / Egyptian Museum, Turin, Italy

 

 

The Kiss, 1908-09 (plaster), Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957) / Private Collection
The Kiss, 1908-09 (plaster), Constantin Brancusi (1876-1957) / Private Collection

 

 

 

 

3. The Kiss

The primitive, simple form of Brancusi's 'The Kiss' is a beautiful expression of love. One big stone has been used to show two people fused together and the intertwining of their arms forms a never-ending embrace.  

 

 

 

4. A need for speed

The multiplication and motion in this Futurist painting was very radical for its time. It's also humorous and reminds me of a children’s cartoon.

 

Dynamism of a Dog on a Lead, 1912, Giacomo Balla (1871-1958) / Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, USA
Dynamism of a Dog on a Lead, 1912, Giacomo Balla (1871-1958) / Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, USA

 

 

Nijinsky's Faun Costume in 'L'Apres Midi d'un Faune' by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)..., 1912 (colour litho), Leon Bakst (1866-1924) / Bibliotheque des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, France
Nijinsky's Faun Costume in 'L'Apres Midi d'un Faune' by Claude Debussy (1862-1918)..., 1912 (colour litho), Leon Bakst (1866-1924) / Bibliotheque des Arts Decoratifs, Paris, France

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Ballet Russes

Léon Bakst was a Russian painter, scene and costume designer. His designs for the Ballet Russes were so elegant and sensual. 

 

 

 

6. Early aviation

In 1909, French Aviator Louis Blériot became the first pilot to (just about) successfully fly over the English Channel.

This is a clip from Wind in the Wires, a 35mm cinema short on the history of aviation.

1909, Louis Bleriot sets off for first flight over the English Channel / Buff Film & Video Library / The Bridgeman Art Library

 

Find out more

Bridgeman Studio Award - we are on the search for the next best contemporary talent. Enter an original artwork on the theme of 'joy' and the winning entry will receive £500 and one year's free subscription to Bridgeman Studio.

Blog: sneak peak - discover more about our new online community for art lovers and professionals, with details about each category, a look at the design and how to apply to be a guest blogger.

Connect with Bridgeman on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn, YouTube, Pinterest, Instagram, Google+ or subscribe to our newsletter.


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